Can You Identify These Star Trek Characters From Just One Image?

By: Andrew Katz

About This Quiz

"Star Trek" the original series aired in 1966 and only lasted for three seasons, but it left a legacy few, if any, would have recognized in the infancy of the franchise. Since the original series ended, "Star Trek" has spawned six sequels, prequels and an animated series. There have been 13 movies, and the franchise is still growing with a resurgence of interest. In addition, there are thousands of books, novels, comics and magazines, as well as countless merchandising products. To call "Star Trek" an empire would be an understatement. 

It all started with three seasons and 79 episodes that followed Captain J. Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise on its five-year mission to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, and "to boldly go where no man has gone before." That five-year mission has blossomed into an ongoing and seemingly unending mission. While characters and plots have changed, the mission has remained the same. 

From "The Original Series" and "The Next Generation" to "Deep Space Nine" and "Destiny," how many of these "Star Trek" characters can you identify from a single image? You probably remember Spock and Chekov, but do you remember Odo or Major Kira Nerys? This quiz has over fifty years of "Star Trek" characters. See how many you can remember!



McCoy first appears in "The Man Trap," the series premiere of the original "Star Trek" series. In the original timeline, Leonard "Bones" McCoy begins his career on the original USS Enterprise under James T. Kirk as lieutenant commander and chief medical officer. By the time he retires, he is an admiral and has the honor of touring the USS Enterprise-D, at the ripe old age of 137!

Spock first appears in "The Cage," the first pilot for the first "Star Trek" series. The character of Spock is the link between three iterations of "Star Trek." He is the only character from the first pilot (iteration one) to be included in the second pilot and original series (iteration two), and he inadvertently creates the Kelvin Timeline of the JJ Abrams-started movie series when he and his Romulan pursuers are sucked back in time by a black hole (iteration three.)

Sarek is Spock's Vulcan father. Sarek's wife was Amanda Grayson, a human teacher.

Kirk first appears in "The Man Trap," the series premiere of "Star Trek." In the original timeline, it takes James Kirk ten years after graduation to get command of the USS Enterprise. And when his tenure ends after his five-year mission, it is two years before Kirk takes command of the Enterprise back from Will Decker to deal with V'Ger.

Kang is a Klingon commander immortalized in the poem, "The Fall of Kang," which is required reading at Starfleet Academy. He is one of the few characters to appear in three "Star Trek" series: the original series (in the episode "Day of the Dove,") "Deep Space Nine" (in the episode "Blood Oath") and "Voyager" (in the episode "Flashback.")

Chekov first appears in "Amok Time," the season two premiere of the original series. In the original timeline, although he is assigned to the USS Enterprise earlier, Ensign Pavel Chekov doesn't show up on-screen until the second season of the original series. The network wanted someone hip to attract younger viewers, so creator Gene Roddenberry came up with the Russian character of Chekov, giving him a mop-top akin to the Beatles and the Monkees.

Uhura first appears in "The Man Trap," the series premiere of the original series. The premiere episode was actually the sixth one filmed, and the order was shuffled later. Uhura is fluent in Swahili, and her name means "freedom" in that language.

Koloth is Kirk's Klingon adversary in the original series episode, "The Trouble with Tribbles." He also accompanies his comrades Kang and Kor to Deep Space Nine in their hunt for the Albino in that series' episode, "Blood Oath."

Kor first appears in the original series episode, "Errand of Mercy." Kor is a Klingon Dahar Master and comrade of Koloth and Kang.

The character of Chief Engineer Montgomery "Scotty" Scott didn't appear on-screen until the third episode of the original series, "Where No Man Has Gone Before." Only his voice "appears" in the series premiere.

Lt. Leslie first appears in "The Man Trap," the original series premiere. He appears in almost sixty episodes of the original series, but only speaks in a few. He is a victim of "red shirt syndrome" in "Obsession" (season two, episode 13,) but shows up alive and well the next week in, "Wolf in the Fold."

Picard first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Captain Jean-Luc Picard wasn't always a captain. He started his career as commander and first officer of the USS Stargazer, assuming the rank after his own captain died in battle. It wasn't until thirty years later that he became the captain of the USS Enterprise-D.

Riker first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Commander William T. Riker turns down two chances to command his own ship, instead choosing to remain Captain Picard's "Number One." He does, however, accept a field promotion to captain the U.S.S. Enterprise-D when Picard is abducted by the Borg.

Counselor Deanna Troi first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "Star Trek: The Next Generation." She is the daughter of a Betazoid ambassador and a Starfleet lieutenant. She remembers her father reading ancient Western bedtime stories to her, then checking under her bed for monsters. He died when she was seven.

Data first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Data first serves aboard Captain Picard's Enterprise as Commander of Ops and the Second Officer with the rank of Lieutenant. He is promoted to First Officer fifteen years later, aboard the USS Enterprise E, but sacrifices himself to save his crew and never gets to serve in his new position.

Lieutenant Worf first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "The Next Generation." Worf was raised by his adoptive human parents after his Klingon parents were killed by Romulans at Khitomer. It was hard for him to reconcile the violent Klingon culture with the non-violent human culture until he inadvertently broke the neck of an opposing team's soccer player at the age of thirteen, and the child died. The guilt he carries with him over this keeps his violent tendencies in check.

Dr. Beverly Crusher first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "The Next Generation." When she was younger, she studied tap and jazz dance in St. Louis, winning several competitions. This earned her the nickname "The Dancing Doctor" at Starfleet Medical School. This performing background leads her to establish a theater troupe aboard the Enterprise, putting on performances of "Cyrano de Bergerac," "The Pirates of Penzance" and "Frame of Mind."

Wesley Crusher first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "The Next Generation." Wesley Crusher is the gifted son of Beverly Crusher. His fears are lightning storms, Bulgallian rats, and whether or not he would be able to make a life-and-death decision in a no-win situation, as Captain Picard did (which caused the death of Wesley's father.)

Lt. Tasha Yar first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "The Next Generation." Lt. Tasha Yar is the first Chief of Security aboard Captain Picard's Enterprise. Despite being hardened emotionally by her violent upbringing on the streets of Turkana IV, she is able to be intimate with Data during the events of the "TNG" episode, "The Naked Now."

Miles O'Brien first appears in "Encounter at Farpoint," the series premiere of "The Next Generation." Miles O'Brien discovered his latent mechanical aptitude when his patrol was attacked by Cardassians on Setlik III, and he had under ten minutes to get a field transporter operational. He did, and he saved thirteen people as a result.

Dr. Katherine "Kate" Pulaski first appears in "The Child", the second season opener of "The Next Generation." She is the Chief Medical Officer of the Enterprise for the year that Dr. Crusher acts as head of Starfleet Medical. She went through three marriages and three divorces in the twelve years after ending her intense relationship with a civilian. The name of that civilian? Kyle Riker, father of William Riker: first officer of the Enterprise during her stay.

Captain Benjamin Sisko first appears in "Emissary", the series premiere of "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine." Captain Benjamin Sisko is a survivor of the Battle of Wolf 359, a battle between the Federation and the Borg. Although his son, Jake, survived, too, Sisko's wife, Jennifer, did not. Years after her death, Sisko marries Kasidy Yates, a freighter captain.

Odo first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." Odo is a Changeling, found floating in space all alone. He was brought to Bajor during the Cardassian occupation and educated at the Bajoran Institute for Science for seven years...as a specimen.

Jake Sisko first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." Jake Sisko is the son of Captain Benjamin Sisko, commander of Deep Space Nine. They live together while Jake is a child, but Jake later moves out and rooms with his Ferengi friend, Nog.

Dr. Julian Bashir first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." Before starting the path to practicing medicine, Dr. Julian Bashir sought a career as a tennis professional. When he realized he wasn't cutting it, he went to Starfleet Medical School and took up racquetball, leading the school's team to the sector championship. He plays racquetball during his assignment on Deep Space Nine with Chief Miles O'Brien.

Major Kira Nerys first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." After Keiko O'Brien is injured, Dr. Bashir uses a transporter to transplant her fetus into Major Kira Nerys. Kira experiences the typical pregnancy symptoms: muscle spasms, swollen feet and sneezing (typical for Bajorans, at least).

Quark first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." Quark had one true love; Natima Lang, a Cardassian journalist. Leaning towards the dissident side her self, she stayed with Quark knowing full well that he was aiding the Bajoran resistance. But she did end things once she discovered that he was using her secret access codes to be paid for fake products.

Lt. Commander Jadzia Dax first appears in "Emissary," the series premiere of "Deep Space Nine." Lt. Commander Jadzia Dax is the eighth host of the Dax symbiote, bonded with the Trill host, Jadzia. She discovers the Bajoran wormhole to the Gamma Quadrant, which is where she serves aboard Deep Space Nine.

Seven of Nine first appears in "Scorpion: Part 2," the fourth season opener of "Star Trek: Voyager." Seven of Nine is possibly one of the first humans assimilated into the Borg, having joined the collective nine years before Captain Picard first encountered the species. When she is "re-assimilated" into humanity, the Voyager's doctor can't remove every trace of her cyborg existence, leaving eighteen percent of her Borg implants.

The Doctor first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." The Doctor is the holographic emergency medical program promoted to Chief Medical Officer after the death of the entire medical staff aboard the USS Voyager. Though the automatic command is changed to let him change his opening line, the Doctor chooses to say the same thing whenever he is activated; the program-standard, "Please state the nature of the medical emergency."

Chakotay first appears in "Caretaker", the series premiere of "Voyager." Captain Hikaru Sulu sponsored Chakotay's admission into Starfleet Academy. Chakotay eventually became an instructor in Starfleet's Advanced Tactical Training. But when his father died fighting the Cardassians for his homeworld, Chakotay joined the Maquis resistance to the Federation-Cardassian border agreement.

Although the character Tuvok first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager," it is not his first appearance in the "Star Trek" universe according to the series' timeline. That would be aboard the USS Excelsior, commanded by Hikaru Sulu, during the Khitomer accords shown in "Star Trek VI." His experiences are shown in "Flashback," a "Voyager" episode from season three.

B'Elanna Torres first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." Originally part of the Maquis, a group opposed to the borders defined by the Federation-Cardassian agreement, B'Elanna Torres becomes Chief Engineer aboard Captain Janeway's Voyager. She is half-Klingon and half-human, and plays hoverball and Parrises Squares to relax.

Tom Paris first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." Tom Paris couldn't handle the pressure of being a scion of a long line of honored Starfleet officers. After being discharged for a mistake that caused the deaths of three of his fellow officers, Paris joined the Maquis, but was captured by Starfleet on his first mission and imprisoned, which is where Captain Janeway recruits him for a special mission.

Neelix first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." Neelix is a Talaxian, native to the Delta Quadrant. He serves aboard the USS Voyager as its chef and chief morale officer (self-appointed) in order to help the crew deal with being stranded so far away from home. When the Voyager finds its way back, Neelix opts to stay in his home quadrant, moving to an asteroid where others of his species live.

Harry Kim first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." Harry Kim is Operations Officer aboard the USS Voyager. A clarinetist in the Juilliard Youth Symphony, he carried his musicianship into adulthood and plays onboard the Voyager with oboist Lt. Susan Nicoletti.

Naomi Wildman first appears in the fourth season "Star Trek: Voyager" episode, "Nemesis." Naomi Wildman is the first child born aboard the USS Voyager. Due to her Ktarian genes (as opposed to her human genes,) she experiences growth at a rapid rate, looking like a four-year-old when she is only two.

Captain Jonathan Archer first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Captain Jonathan Archer is the son of Henry Archer, the lead developer of the Warp Five engine. Captain Archer commands the first ship to be powered by that engine, the Enterprise NX-01.

Dr. Phlox first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Dr. Phlox, of the Enterprise NX-01, is a Denobulan. His species only needs six days of sleep each year, but he claims he can make it on only two.

Sub-Commander T'Pol first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Sub-Commander T'Pol's service on the Enterprise NX-01 is part of a deal between Starfleet and Vulcan. The only way that Vulcan will supply the star charts needed for the NX-01's first outing is if a Vulcan observer was allowed onboard for the mission. Vulcan Science Officer T'Pol is drafted for the job.

Lt. Malcolm Reed first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Lt. Malcolm Reed continues his family's legacy and serves as the Armory Officer aboard the Enterprise NX-01. His grandfather was also an ordinance officer, but not in Starfleet; he served in Britain's Royal Navy.

Ensign Travis Mayweather first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Ensign Travis Mayweather is helmsman of the Enterprise NX-01. As someone who was born in space to parents who lived there, it makes Mayweather a natural pilot.

Commander Charles 'Trip' Tucker III first appears in "Broken Bow," the series premiere of "Enterprise." Commander Tucker got his nickname because he was the third Charles Tucker (after his father and grandfather.) "Trip" is short for "triple." He enjoys deep-sea diving, constructing starships in orbit and inter-species dating.

Kathryn Janeway first appears in "Caretaker," the series premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager." Kathryn Janeway captains the USS Voyager, Intrepid-class, when it disappears in the Badlands. After she (and the ship) return to Federation space, she is promoted to Admiral.

Sulu first appears in "The Man Trap," the series premiere of the original series. In the original timeline, Hikaru Sulu begins his career on the USS Enterprise as the staff physicist. He is transferred to the helm after one year of service and later promoted to Captain of the USS Excelsior.

About Zoo

Our goal at Zoo.com is to keep you entertained in this crazy life we all live.

We want you to look inward and explore new and interesting things about yourself. We want you to look outward and marvel at the world around you. We want you to laugh at past memories that helped shape the person you’ve become. We want to dream with you about all your future holds. Our hope is our quizzes and articles inspire you to do just that.

Life is a zoo! Embrace it on Zoo.com.

Explore More Quizzes